Meet Maggie

Maggie is a happy, generous person who was a blessing to our household. Her cheerful smile reflects how far she has come.

Before she moved into Hope House, Maggie was involved in a domestic violence relationship. Her husband also got her involved in using drugs with him. On the surface, all seemed well, but her children were being neglected, her husband was verbally and emotionally abusing her and the children, and things began to fall apart. A call to Child Protective Services led to the kids being placed in foster care. (Read More) 

Why We Do What We Do: The Need

As a child, have you ever had something happen to you that caused you to be very upset? Did you see people you love get hurt? Did you ever feel like you were being attacked and there was no one to help you? Have you felt like it was you alone against the world?

Most people in the world have had an Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE). The most common are extreme physical danger, experiencing or witnessing abuse, experiencing or witnessing drug use especially among caregivers, neglect, homelessness, and bullying.

Maggie’s children experienced living with an abusive father, living with parents using drugs and not caring for them well, separation from their parents while in foster care, and the stress of homelessness.

Our bodies were made to protect us when we are threatened. They produce stress hormones that give us the energy to run way, fight back, or hide. If we meet a bear in the woods, they help us survive and keep us safe. But when we experience them on an everyday level, like living with an abusive parent or never knowing where you will sleep tomorrow or next week, they become damaging.  (Read more)

How Do We Help?

Adverse Childhood experiences impact all the families at Community of Hope. Our job is to help parents and children heal while they are here.

When Maggie’s family moved into Hope House, they had their own room and knew they could stay there for a while. Maggie was no longer in an abusive relationship and was not using drugs. Her children were reunited with her.

That’s the first step: making sure the children are not continuing to be traumatized. At Community of Hope, we are drug and alcohol free, we have no tolerance for physical or verbal abuse, and families have a safe place to stay for a while. They are surrounded by people who love and support them. Our staff are supportive, encouraging, and help keep everyone safe by enforcing our rules.

Making sure families have a safe place to live leads to the second step. (Read More)

The Result

Impacting families’ lives is our job at Community of Hope. We want them to both heal from past trauma and to find safe and stable homes.  How can we tell if we have been successful? How do we know if parents or children have made any progress?

Seeing if residents continue to not retraumatize is easy. Maggie is clean and has the tools to stay clean. She is not returning to the abusive relationship she had in the past. She now has a stable place to live and the income to pay the bills. Over 75% of the families who complete our program move into a safe place.

Measuring if residents grew and healed is a bit more subjective. (Read more)

Give HOPE

Your support can help us raise $50,000 by the end of the year for families just like Maggie’s.

Donate Today.